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SAT Accommodations

Applying

Before students with disabilities can take the SAT, SAT Subject Tests, PSAT/NMSQT, PSAT 10, or AP Exams with accommodations ó such as extended time or the use of a computer ó their request for accommodations must be approved by Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD).

Most families choose to request College Board accommodations through their school ó instead of using the paper Student Eligibility Form.   SSD Coordinators are often special education coordinators, guidance directors, or school counselors who assume responsibilities related to testing accommodations on College Board exams.

To submit a request without their schoolís involvement, families must request a paper Student Eligibility Form from their counselor or SSD.

It can take about seven weeks for an accommodations request to be processed. 

Once a studentís accommodations are approved by the College Board, they remain in effect until one year after high school graduation (with some limited exceptions) and can be used on the SAT, SAT Subject Tests, PSAT/NMSQT, PSAT 10, and AP Exams. Students do not need to request accommodations from SSD a second time. 

In general, students approved by SSD for College Board testing accommodations meet the criteria discussed below: 

1. Student Has a Documented Disability

Students must have documentation of their disability, such as a current psycho-educational evaluation or a report from a doctor.

2. Participation in a College Board Exam Is
    Impacted

The disability must result in a relevant functional limitation. In other words, it must impact the studentís ability to participate in College Board exams.

3. Requested Accommodation Is Needed

The student must demonstrate the need for the specific accommodation requested.

4. Accommodation Is Received on School Tests

With few exceptions, students who request an accommodation on College Board exams receive that accommodation on tests that they take in school. However, students who receive an accommodation in school or have an Individualized Education Program (IEP) or 504 Plan that includes the accommodation do not automatically qualify for the accommodation on College Board exams. 

In some cases, the College Board concludes that accommodations received by a student in school are not appropriate for College Board exams.

 

SAT Accommodations:
Extra Time & Extra Breaks

When requesting extended time, these two factors must be specified:

  The amount of extended time needed

  The subject areas or test sections for which extended time is needed 

Extended time options include:

  Time and a half, or 50 percent additional time (4 hours and 30 minutes on the new SAT; 5 hours and 45 minutes on the new SAT with Essay)

  Double time, or 100 percent additional time (6 hours on the new SAT;  7 hours and 40 minutes on the new SAT with Essay)

  More time (for instance, in rare circumstances, 150 percent additional time (7 hours and 30 minutes on the new SAT;  9 hours and 35 minutes on the new SAT with Essay)

When students take the SAT with 100 percent or more additional time, the exam is administered over two days and in the studentís school instead of at a designated test center.

Students might not need extended time for every section or test. For instance, a student with a disability impacting mathematical calculation may not need extended time for a critical reading section.

Students approved for extended time in reading will be provided extended time for all test sections because all test sections require reading.

Students who are approved to test with extended time are also automatically approved to test with extra breaks.

 Additional accommodations for breaks are available but need to be applied for separately: 

  Extended breaks between sections or subjects are usually twice the standard time.

  Breaks as needed are given to some students with medical conditions. They are granted as requested by the student during the exam. Students notify their proctors by raising their hands, and the timing of the test pauses. When students are ready to continue, they again notify their proctors, and the timing continues.

Extra or extended breaks are appropriate for students who cannot test for an extended period of time and who need more breaks than those given to all test-takers. Often, students with physical or medical disabilities request extended breaks or breaks as needed if they will need to test blood sugar, take medication, rest, or use the restroom. Some students who request extended breaks will need additional accommodations, such as permission to eat or take medication or permission to test blood sugar. These must be requested specifically.

Testing Schedule for Students with 50% Extra Time

Reading (start of section->as far as you can get): 49 minutes

  5-minute break

 Reading (wherever you left off->end of section): 49 minutes

  5-minute break

  Writing: 53 minutes

  5-minute break

  Math/No Calculator: 38 minutes

  5-minute break

  Math/With Calculator (start of section->as far as you can get): 42 minutes

  5-minute break

 Math/With Calculator (wherever you left off->end of section): 41 minutes

  2-minute break

  Essay/Optional (start of essay->as far as you can get): 38 minutes

  5-minute break

  Essay/Optional (wherever you left off->end of essay): 37 minutes 

Testing Schedule for Students with 100% Extra Time (multi-day/in school)

 Day 1

  Reading (start of section->as far as you can get): 65 minutes

  5-minute break

  Reading (wherever you left off->end of section): 65 minutes

  5-minute break

  Writing: 70 minutes

 Day 2

  Math/No Calculator: 50 minutes

  5-minute break

  Math/With Calculator (start of section->as far as you can get): 55 minutes

  5-minute break

  Math/With Calculator (wherever you left off->end of section): 55 minutes

  2-minute break

 Essay/Optional (start of essay->as far as you can get): 50 minutes

  5-minute break

  Essay/Optional (wherever you left off->end of essay): 50 minutes

  

SAT Accommodations:
Computer for Essay

When a disability impacts a studentís ability to write, a student may request permission to use the word-processing function of a computer to write essays and short-answer responses. Students approved to use a computer on the SAT take the exam in their own school, instead of a designated test center.

The computer accommodation is appropriate for students who have a disability that impacts their written language expression. Examples include students with the following disabilities:

  Physical disabilities that impair the ability to write

   Dysgraphia

   Severe language-based learning disorders

 Some students who need assistance with writing may require an accommodation other than, or in addition to, the use of a computer. Here are some examples:

   Large-block answer sheet

   Writing answers in test booklet

   Writer/scribe 

 

SAT Accommodations:
Reading and Seeing

Many different forms of assistance with reading and seeing are available to students with disabilities if their requests have been approved by the College Board. 

These are some examples of reading and seeing accommodations:

   Large-print test book

   Braille test book

   Braille graphs

   MP3 audio test format

   Reader

   Magnifier/magnifying machine

In most cases, the accommodations listed above are requested for students who have disabilities that impair their ability to read or see. These include the following:

   Blindness

   Other visual impairment

   Severe reading disability 

 

SAT Accommodations:
4-Function Calculator

When a disability impacts a studentís ability to perform mathematic calculations, he or she may request permission to use a four-function calculator for math sections that do not permit the use of a calculator.

Eligibility for Four-Function Calculator Use

Students allowed to use a calculator to take school tests are not necessarily eligible for a calculator accommodation on College Board assessments because College Board assessments can differ from classroom tests. The four-function calculator accommodation must be approved for SSD, and is appropriate for students who have a disability that impacts their ability to perform mathematic calculations; for example, a student diagnosed with specific learning disorder with impairment in mathematics, or dyscalculia.

 

SAT Accommodations:
Best of the Rest

   Presentation

   Large print (14 pt., 20 pt., other)

   Reader (Note: Reader reads entire test)

   Use of a highlighter

   Sign/orally present instructions

  Visual magnification (magnifier or magnifying machine)

   Colored overlays

   Braille

   Braille graphs

   Braille device for written responses

   MP3 audio test format

   Assistive technologyĖcompatible test format

 

Responding

   Verbal; dictated to scribe

   Tape recorder

   Computer without spell-check/grammar/cut-and-paste features

   Record answers in test booklet

   Large-block answer sheet

  Four-function calculator (use of basic four-function calculator on test sections that do not permit use of a calculator)

Timing/Scheduling

   Frequent breaks

   Extended time

  Multiple day (may or may not include extra time)

   Specified time of day

Setting

   Small group setting

   Private room

   Alternative test site (with proctor present)

   Preferential seating

 

SAT Accommodations:
Resources

Set up College Board account:
 
https://www.collegeboard.org

College Board SSD website:
https://www.collegeboard.org/students-with-disabilities

College Board SSD phone number:
212-713-8333

College Board SSD e-mail:
ssd@info.collegeboard.org

 

 

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